Steven Bishop’s ALS Reversal 17th Year

Steven Bishop was only 35 years old when he was diagnosed with ALS in February 2001. Steven is now into his 17th year living with, not dying from, ALS.

At the time of his diagnosis, Steven was happily living with his wife Jennifer and their almost three-year-old son. They had their whole lives ahead of them. Like anyone given an ALS diagnosis, the couple was devastated and Jennifer insisted on getting a second opinion. A few weeks later, a second neurologist at a different hospital confirmed the diagnosis.

One of the first things Steven and Jennifer did was try to find other ALS families. Through their local MDA (Muscular Dystrophy Association) they were able to find other families and start a support group, as well as get valuable information about ALS, what to expect, and how to get equipment. At least they did not feel totally alone.

Steven’s job was extremely stressful so he made the decision to go on disability soon after
 his diagnosis at the recommendation of his doctors. He knew that stress was a contributing factor to disease. They also decided to move into a smaller house on one level, both for wheelchair accessibility and to keep expenses down.

From the beginning, Steven took anti-oxidants C, E, and CoQ10 on the advice of his neurologist. He and his wife already ate a healthy diet and did their best to avoid junk food, and artificial flavors, colors and sweeteners in their home anyway, so they had a head start on a healthy diet.

As many people do after receiving an ALS diagnosis, Steven went into a depression. Jennifer felt all the burden on her, with a three year old and the additional physical and economic responsibilities. She told her husband that they “needed him” to be an active part of their lives.

Fortunately Steven was able to pull out of his depression and decided whether he had 18 months left or 5 years, he was going to live the very best life he could. He wanted his son to remember a father who was positive and happy, not one who was grumpy and complaining. He made up his mind to be a good role model. He and Jennifer decided to focus on the quality of life each day, since they did not know how many days they had left together as a family.

The other thing the couple decided was that they were going to “give back” to the ALS community. If there was no hope for ALS now, at least they could work so there would be hope for others with ALS in the future. They volunteered to help with fundraising for the MDA in their local area. This had an added bonus: focusing on others took their minds off their own problems.

One evening they were asked to attend an MDA fundraising “lock-up” where volunteers were “jailed” at a local restaurant until they raised a certain amount of money. Steven and Jennifer went around the room telling the volunteers how the MDA had helped them. It happened that the local television station was at the fundraiser that night and interviewed the couple. This eventually led them, months later, to be invited to the annual national Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon in Atlanta, where they told their story on national television. Jerry Lewis was so impressed he asked them for their phone number.

To their surprise, Jerry Lewis phoned them soon after, and then every week for the next year for a mental pep-talk. Jerry explained to them that in his 40 years with the MDA that he observed that the people who had the most positive attitudes had far better outcomes with their disease. These phone calls were invaluable. Both Steven and Jennifer made it a point to be more positive during the week so they would be able report back to Jerry.

It is impossible to prove, but both Steven and Jennifer feel that focusing on others, maintaining a positive mental attitude, and deciding to make the very best of whatever time Steven had left, slowed his disease progression along with other therapies they tried.

In addition to taking anti-oxidants, Steven experimented with various therapies that might help slow his ALS symptoms, including chriropractic, massage and “dry needling”. Even if it was only relief of muscle cramping and twitching, he felt some benefit from these.

Since his progress was so slow, they thought Steven might be misdiagnosed, but a third and then eventually a fourth neurologist confirmed his ALS diagnosis.

Despite all of the positive mental attitude, the anti-oxidants and other therapies, Steven continued to decline physically. He could stand and walk for only short periods and needed a wheelchair for anything requiring long periods of walking or standing, like the zoo, museum, park and his son’s field days. He could no longer do stairs, and he was tired much of the time. He continued to exercise as much as he was physically able to.

Still, Steven and Jennifer kept their eyes open for things that might help and in 2009, through a friend, they found a nutritional supplement that is a Nrf2 activator. They did not think it would necessarily reverse ALS, but they did think that it might help Steven stay healthier overall by allowing the body to heal itself. The science was strong and Steven decided to take the new supplement instead of the C, E, and CoQ10 he had been taking. Jennifer also started on the supplement and felt health benefits soon after. Steven did not notice any improvement intially but continued to take it because he knew the science and was convinced it would help him stay healthier.

In 2010, over a year after he started taking the Nrf2 activator, Steven had a good day, when he felt a little less tired, and felt a little stronger. Then, a few weeks later he had another good day. Soon he was having several good days in a row. Several months later his doctor commented that he might be getting stronger in some areas, and even stated “I believe you will be around to see your son get married and have kids.” To Steven and Jennifer, this seemed like a miracle! It was a memorable day.

Over the next months and years, Steven slowly regained strength. Eventually he no longer needed his wheelchairs nor his walker. They called the ALS Association to give back the equipment. Steven remembers the freedom he felt the day the ALS Association picked up the electric wheelchair that had been donated to them so someone else could use it.

Today, in 2017, sixteen years after diagnsosis, Steven still has ALS. He still deals with fine motor skill issues, he gets fatigued if he does too much. He can do some yard work but if he overdoes it he pays for it the next day. Steven still cannot return to work because anything stressful causes his symptoms to worsen. He still uses a bi-pap for ALS-induced sleep apnea and baclofen for muscle tension when needed. Steven and Jennifer are grateful for Steven’s dramatic recovery. He can do stairs again, and drive again and continues to slowly improve physically.

Steven and Jennifer still give their time to others diagnosed with ALS. They also share the Nrf2-activating supplement, because they feel it was part of the reason Steven has been able to successfully reverse ALS.

To find out more about Steven in his own words, visit https://alsliving.wordpress.com/.

 

Cathy Cummins lives a full life despite ALS diagnosis

Cathy Cummins, DC was diagnosed with PLS in 2005 and ALS in 2008

She was a busy chiropractor, helping students and patients while pursuing her dreams. Like many people with active professional and personal lives, she often overworked her body.

Before her diagnosis, Cathy competed as a hopeful for the 1992 U.S. Judo team for the Barcelona Olympics until she broke her arm. She became a competition body builder.

She continued her post-doctoral education to become the best she could be in her profession while continuing to work.

When Cathy was diagnosed she knew, as a holistic healer, that one could accept the diagnosis without accepting the prognosis. She enlisted the help of her partner, also a chiropractor, and other health professionals, including a highly skilled naturopath to help her plan and adjust her program.

As a medical professional, Cathy knew the importance of nutrition, supplements and detoxification. She also knew that rest, stress reduction, staying positive and keeping mentally and emotionally healthy were an essential part of healing.

Cathy used all the tools at her disposal, including traditional medicine. She took a prescription muscle relaxant and had a medication pump
implanted into her spine to help her with her cramping. With her own research and the help of other professionals she experimented with supplements and protocols she knew were low risk that might possibly help her symptoms.

Despite all of her best efforts, Cathy’s physical condition continued to worsen. However, she knew she was on the right track and she knew that holistic protocols take time to be effective, so she persevered and made the best of whatever state her body was in.

During this time, Cathy remained in her job as an assistant professor teaching chiropractic on a part-time basis. She thoroughly enjoyed her work and it took her mind off of her diagnosis. She used a van with a lift and an electric wheelchair to get to, from and around campus.

Cathy’s diaphragm and voice were very weak, working at 50-60% of normal, so she used a ChatterVox and micrphone at work so that she could be heard while teaching.

While experimenting with various treatments and working part-time, Cathy knew her emotional well-being was just as essential to healing, so she made sure to include fun in her life. She kept up her annual trips to Mexico with her family, even though it meant sometimes being carried by friends when things were not wheelchair accessible, even once using a luggage rack for transport.

Cathy joined a competition-level singing group, despite only being able to stand for short periods, needing a machine to amplify her voice, and sometimes needing assistance breathing. Cathy was very excited to be able to sing the National Anthem at a ball game with one of her quartets. She also took up wheelchair curling for recreation.

With all this, at times Cathy’s symptoms were scary. At her worst, she needed a respirator at night and her partner wondered if she would even make it until morning. She had an Ambu Bag with her at all times on her wheelchair since she had passed out a few times from a lack of oxygen and over exertion. Cathy needed help cutting up her food and needed her wheelchair both in and out of the house. Friends and family prepared for the worst, while hoping for the best and never giving up.

Finally, after years of experimenting with various protocols, mostly holistic, Cathy’s symptoms turned around. She got so good at wheelchair curling she made the 2014 Sochi Paralympic team as a the women’s alternate. Unfortunately—or fortunately—shortly after the Olympic trials she was disqualified from the paralympic team because her symptoms improved so much she no longer qualified. She was no longer “disabled enough”. Fortunately a rule change allowed her to stay on the team.

Today, Cathy is slowly giving away the equipment she has accumulated over the years such as canes, walkers and wheelchairs. If she overworks or overstresses, her ALS symptoms worsen. To maintain her health, she needs to rest, exercise, watch what she eats and take supplements. She continues to tweak her protocol.

Cathy is a poster person for ALS reversal. Her courage, determination and perseverance have paid off. She was not afraid to enlist help from her partner, family, friends and colleagues, all of whom helped her heal. She sought professional help from a naturopath
and other experts, even though she was a professional herself. She took the time and effort to maintain her emotional and mental health throughout the process. She made sure she had fun and came up with fulfilling things to do to enrich her life, at every stage of her disease, no matter what the level of her disability.

Today Cathy celebrates her improvement. Thank you Cathy, for showing others what is possible.

Joyce now 83, 29 years after ALS diagnosis

Back in 1988, Joyce Brown was diagnosed with ALS at age 54. Her symptoms were

Joyce Brown

muscle cramping, muscle twitching (fasciculations), difficulty swallowing, breathing, and walking, choking on saliva, and losing her voice. She went to a second doctor who confirmed her diagnosis.    

To be absolutely sure of her diagnosis she traveled to a neurologist in Salt Lake City who had experience with ALS and had a third confirmation of her ALS diagnosis. The neurologist told her she might live until Thanksgiving, only five months away.

Hoping for a miracle she tried to find someone who had any kind of treatment that might work. Through her doctor in Las Vegas Nevada she learned of a homeopathic treatment from Germany that had apparently worked for some ALS patients in Germany. She agreed to try it and traveled 900 miles round trip once a week to get the treatments—injections which mixed her blood with the homeopathic remedy. She was also told to eat only whole foods and not consume meat products during the treatment period.

After 10 weeks of homeopathic treatments and 9000 miles of driving she still continued to get worse. Walking was extremely difficult, she could no longer eat in public and regularly choked on her food. People were having so much trouble understanding her speech that she looked for a voice board to communicate.

After 10 weeks of treatments Joyce’s doctor went on vacation for a week. She got so much worse the week with no treatment that she convinced the doctor to continue treatments when he returned.

All of this time Joyce continued to pray. She had a near death experience several years before her ALS diagnosis and had felt close to God since that time.

Joyce also knew that thoughts affected the body and so did not want to think anything that might affect her body in a negative way. She recited positive phrases out loud over and over again throughout each day to keep her mind positive. In addition, each night Joyce put on headphones during sleep listening to “sleep teaching”–her recorded voice repeatedly saying positive statements.

Joyce also decided to no longer attend ALS support groups during her treatment because they focused on how much everyone was deteriorating and what to expect with physical decline, instead of on what one could do to slow, stop or reverse the ALS progression. She did not want any negative thoughts entering her mind.

Joyce also saw a spiritual counselor and realized that in case she died she needed to forgive everyone in her life she felt had wronged her, including herself. She also asked God to bless her life. Looking back on this, Joyce feels forgiving herself and others was a key part to her healing.

Joyce continued to pray to heal, although she prepared in case God had other plans for her. She continued her weekly homeopathic injection treatments.

About a week after her 16th homeopathic treatment, while praying, Joyce felt a shift. She
described it felt like grey smoke lifting off of her. From that moment she felt different and when her husband came home that day he said she looked different. She no longer felt like she was choking.

In the coming weeks Joyce’s muscle wasting stopped progressing. Her doctor tested her and said her ALS was gone. She continued to gain strength over the next few months, although her muscle mass never completely returned. After more time, Joyce’s voice finally recovered completely.

Today Joyce is almost 84 years old, lives on her own and stays active. She has had life challenges and other health problems including two bouts with macular degeneration which have affected her vision but her ALS symptoms have never returned in the past 29 years.

Joyce is founder and president of Stress and Greif Relief, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization—helpstopsuicide.org, where she administers a suicide prevention lifeline (800-734-3439).

Joyce’s favorite saying is “Believe in Miracles, Expect Miracles and BE a Miracle for someone else.”

Joyce’s book in which she describes her near death experience before she was diagnosed with ALS is called God’s Heavenly Answers by Joyce Brown, available on Amazon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Importance of Knowing it is Possible to Heal

By Dawn McCrea, diagnosed ALS 2002
  
I was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) aka Lou Gehrig’s disease in 2002 and I am writing this January 2017, so I’ve spent over 14 years working with alternative and energy healing practitioners, learning how to work with energy and do energy healing myself. 
 
I have used many different techniques and I learned something from each one, but there was no one thing that healed all the issues.  So, I created my own practice for healing that works for me. 
 
The first step in my healing practice is knowing that it is possible to heal.  I truly believe this belief and the fact that I took continuous action to support my healing are the reasons that I am doing so well.
 

An important step in achieving any goal is to be around or in contact with people who are successful in that area.  Search for and connect with people who have or are healing.  Read books, watch videos, join groups and follow people who have healed, who inspire or motivate you. 

What did the people who healed, transformed or succeed do?  How did they do it? 
 
Years ago, I learned that there were people in my life that thought I was in denial.  After being given a diagnosis of ALS (aka Lou Gehrig’s disease), which for most is terminal, instead of worrying about what might happen, I continued living as if I wasn’t going to die… 
 
Even while doctors were trying to figure out what was wrong, I was   working with an incredibly supportive group of alternative and energy healing practitioners.    I kept trying treatment, supplements and energy healing, I kept the ones that helped, discarded the ones that didn’t and continued to try new ones.  I NEVER GAVE UP.
 
To the extent possible, limit the amount of time you spend with negative people.  Unfortunately, we can’t avoid all the negative people and messages, but we can learn to limit the impact they have on us and our attitude.  Choose to FOCUS on the positive messages not on the naysayers and negative ones.
 
When you are experiencing a health issue, life can feel hard or painful.  You should feel the pain, maybe cry or throw a pillow, then pick yourself up    and change your focus to something positive.  Be a “Half-Full” kind of person, be happy for what you can do not frustrated with what you can’t.
 
Belief Busting
 
This disease is incurable; therefore, I can’t heal.
Is that always true?  What if it is not true?
Do people heal from incurable diseases?  If you did research on people who have healed from incurable / terminal illness or injury, you would never be done.  There are an unlimited number of “miracle” healings.
Belief Busted!!!!!!!!
 
I hope you find this helpful and I believe that joining the HealingALS website will provide information and inspiration to support your healing
 
Dawn McCrea
Energy Healing Strategies
 
 
 Dawn McCrea California, USA dawnmccrea@yahoo.com
 
 

A Holiday Message for PALS

YOUR PERSONAL “RESET BUTTON” by Steven Shackel, diagnosed ALS 1995

When a computer becomes overloaded with information or there is a software conflict and it “freezes”, the solution is often to simply restart the computer. Some machinery has a “reset” button that does much the same.

Sometimes you cannot help but be stressed by illness, financial difficulties, pain or simply frustration at your temporary inability to resolve life’s various problems. When it becomes too much to deal with, create a mental “reset button” for yourself. This may not make the problems go away immediately but it will allow you to return to an emotionally stable and positive base from which to view your life.

Rich or poor, sick or well, the best one can expect from life is to be fundamentally happy. This is a matter of choice rather than circumstance!

Rather than looking at what you cannot do, look at what you can do. Concentrate on what you have and not what you lack. By taking this approach to everything in life you can hit your mental Reset Button to become “fundamentally happy” again.

PALS have one of the most frustrating and potentially disempowering illnesses. There is no “off switch” to make ALS go away yet but we can all create our own Reset Button that will restart us in a happy state of mind, regardless of discomfort, frustration and any other unpleasant side effects of ALS.

On one level, being fundamentally happy is as good as it gets. Decisions made in this state of mind are likely to be clearer, more stable and certainly more coherent than those made whilst depressed, frustrated or just plain ill.

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How to be happy, with a diagnosis of ALS or not — 2 videos & story at bottom

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Being ill has nothing whatsoever to do with being happy. Many wealthy, successful and perfectly healthy people are deeply unhappy.

Rather than, “I’ve had enough, I give in, I don’t care”, it’s possible to take a broader view and think, “If everything starts from here and now, what would I change, how would I change myself and how will I deal with those things I cannot change at the moment?” then act on your conclusions. There is always something you can change, however small. Never underrate the “small” things. We all have to start somewhere and “small” change may be all it takes.

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How to be happy, with a diagnosis of ALS or not — 2 videos & story at bottom

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If being happy is the best it gets then that is the perfect place from which to view your life and make the necessary changes and decisions. Your mental Reset Button is immensely helpful. Used it several times a day in difficult times. Use a reset button in your life. Try it and see. It’s my Christmas gift to you.

— Steve Shackel

A miracle is not the suspension of natural law but the operation of a higher law.

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How to be happy, with a diagnosis of ALS or not — 2 videos & story at bottom

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People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered;
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives;
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies;
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere people may deceive you;
Be honest and sincere anyway.

What you spend years creating others could destroy overnight;
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous;
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it may never be enough;
Give your best anyway.

–Mother Teresa

VIdeo 1 (4 min) – A different perspective on limitations.

Are we making the best of this moment? Do we appreciate our life up until now?

Video 2 (12 min) – 5 proven ways to increase your happiness & positivity today.

Story – Happiness is a choice – Every day 

DANCE LIKE NOBODY’S WATCHING

 

Jeff was the kind of guy you love to hate. He was always in a  good mood and always had something positive to say. When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, “If I were any better, I would be twins!”

 

He was a unique manager because he had several waiters who had followed him around from restaurant to restaurant as he changed jobs. The reason the waiters followed Jeff was because of his attitude. He was a natural motivator.  If an employee was having a bad day, Jeff was there  telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the situation.

 

One day I asked Jeff, “I don’t get it! You can’t be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?”

 

Jeff replied, “Each day I say to myself, Jeff, you have two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood.’ I choose to be in a good mood.  Each time something bad happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it. I choose to learn from it. Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of life. I choose the positive side of life.”

 

“Yeah, but it’s not that easy,” I protested.

 

“Yes, it is,” Jeff said. “Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations. You choose how people will affect your mood. You choose to be in a good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It’s your choice how you live life.”

 

I often thought about Jeff when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it.

Several years later, I heard that he had been shot in a robbery.  After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, he was released from the hospital with fragments of the bullets still in his body.

 

I saw him about six months after the accident and when I asked him how he was, he said, “If I were any better, I’d be twins. Wanna see my scars?”

 

I asked him what had gone through his mind as the robbery took place.

 

“As I lay on the floor, I remembered that I had two choices: I could choose to live, or I could choose to die.  I chose to live.

When I got to the emergency room and I saw the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses. I got really scared. In their eyes I read, “He’s a dead man”  so I knew I needed to take action.”

 

“What did you do?” I asked.

 

“Well, there was a big, burly nurse shouting questions at me,” said Jeff. “She asked if I was allergic to anything. “Yes,’ I replied. Bullets!’

Over their laughter, I told them, “I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead.” Jeff lived thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his amazing attitude.

 

I learned from him that every day we have the choice to live fully.

Attitude, after all, is everything.

You always have choices

Work like you don’t need the money

Love like you’ve never been hurt

Dance like nobody’s watching